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Steven Carrasco

2008 Research

Abstract: False Memory: How Accurate is Your Memory?

Mentor: Dr. Leonard Stern, Psychology

False memory can be seen in the medical community, eyewitness testimony, and in our personal lives. The accurate recall of events is critical in our society, and has prompted research to further investigate this phenomenon. False memory can be reliably demonstrated in the laboratory using what is known as the DRM procedure. This entails presenting a series of priming words for study (e.g., note, sound, piano, etc.) that are related to a non-presented critical word (e.g., music). Our research explores variations on the DRM procedure by presenting words in massed, spaced, varied, and identical conditions to better understand the mechanisms behind false memory recall. The outcomes of a recognition test were consistent across the studies and not all easily accounted for by the activation-monitoring view even though each priming list activated a non-presented word nine times, most false memory occurred when words were massed and in the context of different words (varied).

Abstract: The Process of Creating False Memories: Easier Said Than Done?

Mentor: Dr. Leonard Stern

People can easily be induced to falsely remember events using what has come to be known as the DRM procedure. The DRM procedure entails presenting a series of words for study (e.g., bed, rest, tired, awake, etc.) that are related to a non-presented critical word (e.g., sleep). The typical finding is that memory of the critical non-presented word is about as good as that of any presented word. To examine the activation-monitoring account of false memory, study lists were presented that included three DRM words each presented three times either massed or spaced and either in sets of three identical versus three different words. The outcome of the recognition test was difficult for the activation-monitoring view to explain: even though each priming lists activated a non-presented word nine times, most false memory occurred when words were massed and in the context of different words (varied).

Presentations

17th Annual McNair Conference and Grad. School Fair Delavan, WI: Oct 31 Nov 2, 2008

12th Annual EWU Student Research and Creative Works Symposium: May 20, 2009

11th Ann. Resrch & CW Symp., EWU, May 14, 2008

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