C Courses


With a wide variety of courses offered online, you can earn your degree when it’s convenient for you.

Career & Technical Education

CTED 300. INTRODUCTION TO CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Notes: Industry and Business Route/Plan 2 students may simultaneously take CTED 492.
Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
An introduction to the elements of Career and Technical Education and Plan 2/business and Industry Route certification. This course includes current components of education in Washington State and the nation, the process for CTE certification, as well as the implication for CTE.

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CTED 301. PHILOSOPHY OF CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 3 Credits.

Notes: Industry and Business Route/Plan 2 students may simultaneously take CTED 492.
Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of the instructor.
Study of the role of Career and Technical Education (CTE) in the American education system at all levels including the history of CTE, program standards and frameworks, advisory committees, state and federal regulations, and CTE funding.

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CTED 309. CTE CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
Course addresses minor issues such as school law and abuse and mandated reporting. The course also includes instructional practices that provide inclusive learning environments to support diverse learners at both the secondary (7–12) level and today’s business environment. Students develop instructional skills in identifying barriers to learner success, selecting strategies that support learners while differentiating learning for individual success.

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CTED 341. CTE SECONDARY STRATEGIES. 3 Credits.

Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
This course addresses continuous improvement of instruction through reflective practices for two groups of students. Career and Technical Education (CTE) students: Develop edTPA lesson plans and focus on instructional alignment of assessments to standards and outcomes in order to evaluate instructional effectiveness through data collection and analysis. Participants collect evidence of professional instructional growth with self-reflections to experience the teacher/principal evaluation.

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CTED 399. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: permission of the instructor, department chair and college dean.

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CTED 474. ADMINISTRATION OF WORK-SITE EDUCATION. 4 Credits.

Notes: Industry and Business Route/Plan 2 students may simultaneously take CTED 485 and CTED 492.
Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
Course provides students the opportunity to satisfy the certification requirements for candidates pursuing qualifications to teach CTE work-site learning and career choices. Includes instruction in the areas of work-site learning, occupational analysis, student leadership, workplace safety, and advisory partnerships.

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CTED 485. MANAGEMENT OF CTE PRACTICUM. 1 Credit.

Notes: Industry and Business Route/Plan 2 students may simultaneously take CTED 300, CTED 301 or CTED 474.
Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
Students will complete 60 hours of classroom instructional practicum to demonstrate student learning as well as an assessment tool for CTE certification.

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CTED 492. CTE PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIO. 1 Credit.

Notes: Industry and Business Route/Plan 2 students may simultaneously take CTED 301 or CTED 474. This course may be repeated for credit.
Pre-requisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.
Students create a professional development portfolio to organize CTE competencies and curriculum design as they progress through the Plan2/Business and Industry Route program.

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Chicana/o/x Studies

CHST 320. CHICANX-LATINX POLITICS IN U.S. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
The purpose of this course is to study the political reality of Latinxs in the U.S.: a heterogeneous group made up largely of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban American origin and other groups (Central and South Americans). This class examines the Latino population in terms of its orientation to the political system, its institutions, actors and their participation in the electoral process.

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CHST 330. LATINO IMMIGRATION TO THE U.S.. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course is a historical overview of Latino immigration from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Special attention is given to the largest Latino sub groups in the United States. Students examine the social phenomenon of labor migration and immigration from Latin America in the context of political, economic and national inequalities. The transnational character of Latino immigrants and its political, economic and cultural contributions to sending and receiving nations are covered.

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Children's Studies

CDST 300. FOUNDATIONS OF CHILDREN'S STUDIES–PART I. 2 Credits.

Notes: Available for all EWU students–non-majors, those considering the CDST major, and declared CDST majors. A background check will be completed as a requirement of the course.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101.
This introductory course provides students with an overview of the discipline including the history, focus and curriculum. Additionally, students will explore career options related to Children's Studies.

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CDST 302. FOUNDATIONS OF CHILDREN'S STUDIES–PART 2. 3 Credits.

Notes: Prior to registration students must present the CDST program with proof of successfully passing a Washington State background check for working with children. Students who cannot pass this background check will not be allowed to register.
Pre-requisites: CDST 300 and declared CDST major.
This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the discipline, its history, focus, curriculum and professional application. Expounding on CDST 300, this course examines methods, theories and practices related to the study of children and childhood.

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CDST 303. INFANT AND TODDLER DEVELOPMENT. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
Students are introduced to the process of human development from conception to age two with an emphasis on embryonic, fetal, neonatal, infant, and toddler stages.

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CDST 306. VARIATIONS IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT: CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL NEEDS IN HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS. 5 Credits.

Notes: Option A elective.
Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
This course focuses on individuals with special needs including disability, chronic illness, severe developmental delay, minimally conscious state and persistent vegetative state in healthcare systems. Students learn to assess children with disability and developmental delay, provide appropriate interventions and work with families.

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CDST 325. MINDFULNESS AND ALTERNATIVE PRACTICES FOR WORKING WITH CHILDREN. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
Mindfulness focuses on using intentional movement and breathing to foster calm, strength, balance, connection, and awareness. The benefits of mindfulness for children include increased self-awareness and self-confidence, increased calm, focus, and academic performance, improved mood and behavior, development of resilience and empathy, better emotional regulation and intelligence and increased health and happiness.

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CDST 326. BODIES, SOCIALIZATION AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: GWSS 326, DSST 326.
Notes: CDST students only: CDST 300.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 201 or equivalent.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course examines cultural beliefs about gender, sex, sexuality, and the body. Experiences throughout our lifetimes impact ways that we learn to embody gender, express sexuality, and live in our bodies. We use intersectional feminist approaches to consider the variety of lived, embodied experiences and social effects of categorizing bodies.

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CDST 330. RESEARCH METHODS FOR STUDYING CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
This course addresses methodologies and statistical techniques of data analysis for child-related fields. Using child centered data, this course covers descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, and qualitative methodologies. Students learn to analyze and present statistical data.

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CDST 386. CHILDREN AND THE FAMILY. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: GWSS 386.
Pre-requisites: CDST 300 or instructor approval.
This course examines children’s roles in the family and the dynamic relationship between the family and other social institutions (e.g. health care system, legal system, economy, education). This course uses various theoretical frameworks (e.g., structural functionalism, conflict theory, symbolic interactionism, feminist theory, family systems, social learning theory) to understand families.

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CDST 402. CHILDREN'S RIGHTS, LAWS AND ETHICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
This course offers an in-depth examination of various laws and ethical issues present in a variety of helping professions associated with youth. Historical contexts for these laws are examined. This course examines various state and federal laws concerning work with youth. Students are presented with multiple approaches to solving arrays of ethical dilemmas based on best practice procedures.

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CDST 411. CHILD LIFE THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
This course involves the careful examination of children and their families in a healthcare setting. It is taught from the perspective of a Child Life Specialist to aid in minimizing the stress and anxiety experienced during hospitalization. It focuses on educational and play components, and the general support and scope of practice unique to the field.

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CDST 421. PLAY AND PLAYWORK. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
Students research definitions, history, theories, forms and functions of play. Students examine the different environments for play throughout history. Topics include free play, value of toys and games, children’s digital play, and the roles of creativity and marketing in today’s society.

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CDST 422. CHILDREN'S LOSS AND GRIEF. 4 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with CDST 522.
Pre-requisites: senior standing or instructor permission.
This course explores the ways children experience loss, including death, at different developmental stages and how different cultures view children’s grief. The course introduces students to a variety of organizational situations where adults work with children who are experiencing loss and grief.

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CDST 431. CHILD LIFE PRACTICE ASSESSMENT AND PREPARATION. 5 Credits.

Notes: Designated for students in Option A: Child Life and Health within the Children's Studies Program.
Pre-requisites: CDST 430.
May be stacked with CDST 531 This course focuses on the use of assessment and observation strategies to document development, growth, play and learning to join with families and professionals in promoting children’s success. Students engage with strategies and information in preparation for the Child Life Professional Examination, including information on intervention and professional responsibility associated with pediatric care.

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CDST 432. SCHOOL REINTEGRATION AND SUPPORT. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with CDST 532.
Pre-requisites: senior standing or instructor permission.
This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to gain exposure to the world of pediatric medical diagnoses and use that knowledge to support a child’s transition between the hospital and the classroom and community settings. Students examine the school reentry process for pediatric patients, the role of school counselors, and the impact of the return of the student patient on the teachers. They also analyze laws and policies protecting the affected children.

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CDST 433. PEDIATRIC PALLIATIVE CARE. 4 Credits.

Notes: Designated for students declared in Option A: Child Life and Health within the Children's Studies major. This class may be stacked with CDST 533.
Pre-requisites: senior standing or instructor permission.
This course explores the care of children in pediatric palliative care, including comparing palliative care to hospice care and discussing the challenges to access of these services. The course will look at the variety of illnesses that impact children and adolescents and the ways in which pediatric palliative care services may prove beneficial. Students will gain insight in the experience of childhood illness for the ill child, siblings, parents and other family members.

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CDST 438. TRAUMA-INFORMED CARE WITH CHILDREN AND FAMILIES. 5 Credits.

Notes: designated as an elective for students declared in Option A: Child Life and Health and as a required course for students in Option C: Community Programming for Children within the Children's Studies major.
Pre-requisites: CDST 300.
This course examines the unique long-term impact of trauma on children. Students will examine the impact of trauma on brain development and functioning as well as long-term challenges associated with cognitive and social functioning. Students will learn evidence-based, best-practices for responding to trauma. Students will learn about assessment tools for trauma as well as treatment tools to help those integrate traumatic experiences.

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CDST 439. TOPICS IN CHILDREN'S STUDIES. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be repeated for credit, providing the title is different.
This variable topic class explores current issues and interests in the field of children’s studies. Topics might include children’s studies perspectives on contemporary issues, current research issues of specific faculty or deeper investigation of topics covered in core courses. Topics or issues that might be covered in this course range from play to children’s activism.

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CDST 481. CDST OPTION A INTERNSHIP AND FIELDWORK. 4 Credits.

Notes: Designed for students who are completing their clinical internship supervised by a licensed Child Life Specialist and/or general health-related internship. Requires the successful completion of a background check.
Pre-requisites: CDST 302 and senior standing.
This course provides practical experience for students pursuing Child Life certification eligibility requirements with the Association of Child Life Professionals (formerly Child Life Council). This course provides an opportunity to gain experience and practice in applying skills in an appropriate medical setting while under the supervision of a Certified Child Life Specialist and/or instructor with health-related background who meets supervisory requirements.

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CDST 482. CDST OPTION B INTERNSHIP. 4 Credits.

Notes: Designed for students declared in the Children's Studies Option B–Child Services. Requires the successful completion of a background check.
Pre-requisites: CDST 302 and senior standing.
Students receive academic credit for internships supervised within organizations working with or on behalf of children. The internship is initiated by the student and facilitated by their academic advisor, the site supervisor and the Career Services Internship Offices. Students complete a Learning Contract, which outlines expectations, roles and responsibilities, as well as the process of documentation and evaluation.

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CDST 483. CDST OPTION C INTERNSHIP. 4 Credits.

Notes: Initiated by the student and facilitated by their academic advisor, their site supervisor and the Career Services Internship Office. Requires the successful completion of a background check.
Pre-requisites: CDST 302 and senior standing.
Students receive academic credit for internships supervised within organizations working with or on behalf of children. Students complete a Learning Contract, which outlines expectations, roles and responsibilities, the process of documentation and evaluation.

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CDST 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE CHILDREN'S STUDIES. 5 Credits.

Notes: requires the successful completion of a background check.
Pre-requisites: CDST 302 and senior standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
Using knowledge of children, childhood, and children's issues, students will research, design and implement a joint community-based service-learning project in collaboration with local organizations that work with and/or on-behalf of children.

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CDST 495. CHILD LIFE PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP. 1-10 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing or approval of instructor.
This course is designed for students who are completing a clinical practicum/internship in a Child Life or other health setting. Child Life practicums and Internships must be supervised by a CCLS for certification eligibility requirements with the Association of Child Life Professionals. Students will complete 120+ hours, and will participate in weekly online discussions. Students are expected to complete a work journal, keep accurate time records, and evaluate their experience.

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CDST 496. EXPERIMENTAL. 1-5 Credits.

Experimental.

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CDST 499. DIRECTED STUDY. 1-15 Credits.

Communication Studies

CMST 207. COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY AND CITIZENSHIP. 5 Credits.

Notes: the course will culminate with students creating a reasoned, ethical argument as a final project.
This course is designed to develop critical thinking skills as exhibited in reasoning and argumentation, with a further goal of examining how the power of an individual's voice can affect society. The course begins with a study of the rhetorical tradition of reasoning and argumentation, including elements of ethics. As the course progresses students will analyze, from historical to modern times, examples of individuals using their voice and the resulting impact upon society.

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CMST 208. MASS MEDIA AND THE INFORMATION SOCIETY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
This course introduces students to the range of historical, cultural, economic and social issues affected by the development and continued evolution of mass media. Books, magazines, sound and video recording, the development of electronic media and of the internet provide the context for examinations of media uses and effects, media policy and law and social effects of media.

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CMST 210. INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

This course is an exploration of the human communication process. It includes the perceptual and attribution processes surrounding messages, the construction of verbal and nonverbal messages, the functions of messages in interaction, and the role of interpersonal communication processes on a variety of interpersonal relationship types.

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CMST 261. LISTENING SKILLS. 2 Credits.

Notes: this course is delivered online only.
This course is meant to teach you the knowledge by which to increase your communication listening skills and become a more effective listener. This course will open your minds for what others expect of you in regards to listening in communicative interaction.

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CMST 309. COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION. 5 Credits.

An introduction to the history and development of communication theory. This is the first course in the communication major as well as the first course in communication theory. Topics include theory development, observation techniques, a survey of theories, and ethical questions.

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CMST 330. INTEGRATED METHODS FOR COMMUNICATION RESEARCH. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: declared Major in CMST, CMST PR, Entrepreneurial Communications, or Interdisciplinary Studies with a CMST emphasis.
An introduction to the core group of scientific methods and analytic techniques used in communication research.

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CMST 340. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

Notes: English and computer proficiency desired but not required.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This is a combination theory and application course on intercultural communication. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to some of the fundamental topics, theories, concepts, and principles that are at the center of the study of intercultural communication. The course follows a multi-media approach; students will see how media (newspapers, TV, film, and Internet) reveal patterns of cultural behavior and shape how we see and interact with people from other cultures.

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CMST 396. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-15 Credits.

CMST 411. NEGOTIATION SKILLS AND STRATEGIES. 5 Credits.

The basic premise of this course is that one needs strong negotiation and analytical skills for effective communication. Hence, the goal of this course is to help the student to understand the theory of negotiation and to master its main strategies. The course will allow the student to develop negotiation skills experientially and to appreciate the nature and role of effective negotiation. The course is relevant to any student pursuing a career in a social science field since, as a working professional, the student will face many conflict problems that can be best resolved through effective negotiation.

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CMST 430. COMMUNICATION IN ORGANIZATIONS. 5 Credits.

The study of communication systems, channels, networks, and barriers; the role of communication in organizational assessment and change; the relationship between communication practices and organizational effectiveness, corporate image, and credibility.

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CMST 458. TOPICS IN IMAGE, MESSAGES AND MEANING. 5 Credits.

This course allows students to learn effective visual and written communication in the creation of meaning. Students will be offered the opportunity to gain knowledge and build on this information by evaluating others' efforts at message design, and then by creating their own effective image and/or message to convey meaning.

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CMST 461. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC RELATIONS THEORY. 5 Credits.

Notes: CMST 461, CMST 462 and JRNM 453 are the three core PR classes for the Communication Studies, Public Relations major and Journalism, Public Relations major.
Pre-requisites: junior standing.
Explores a broad range of concepts, elements, skills and impacts, including theory and applications; examines the role of public relations in business and society and as a profession.

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CMST 462. ADVANCED PUBLIC RELATIONS THEORY. 5 Credits.

Notes: CMST 461, CMST 462 and JRNM 453 are the three core PR classes for the Communication Studies, Public Relations major and Journalism, Public Relations major.
Pre-requisites: CMST 461, JRNM 332; or permission of instructor.
Applies journalism, communications and public relations theories and skills to case study examples in organizations and communication environments.

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CMST 475. ELECTRONIC SURVEILLANCE AND PRIVACY. 5 Credits.

The course examines the social implications of a world in which everyday life is increasingly subject to electronic surveillance. The course begins with a survey of the theoretical and policy approaches to understanding the growth of electronic surveillance and its consequences. As the course progresses, students will conduct in-depth analyses of various modes of surveillance. The course concludes with a critical assessment of regulatory approaches to surveillance.

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CMST 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
Senior Capstone is a required course for all students graduating with degrees in Communication Studies. Communication topics integrated into course content will include audiences, codes, interaction, power and influence, strategy, ethics, messages and contexts. In a seminar format and focused on contemporary issues relating to communication, the course will focus on the professional development of communication studies students. Students will also prepare and defend a portfolio.

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CMST 496. EXPERIMENTAL COURSE. 1-5 Credits.

See EagleNET for current listings.

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Core Social & Behavioral Sciences

CSBS 200. INTRODUCTION TO LEADERSHIP. 3 Credits.

An introduction to basic leadership skills, this course will cover models in a variety of areas such as communication, decision making, problem solving, time management, conflict resolution and ethics.

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CSBS 310. FOUNDATIONS OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES THEORY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: completion of the general education core course requirements in the social sciences as specified in this catalog or permission of the instructor.
This course is intended to expose the philosophic choices and historical constraints that underlie all of the social and behavior sciences. In terms as simple as possible, we explore foundational alternatives (which may include idealism vs. materialism, individualism vs. holism, structure vs. agency, value neutrality vs. social critique) and the impact of history on the social and behavioral science. By emphasizing the controversiality and diversity within the disciplines, and the social contexts that shape them, we encourage students to discover sharply critical perspectives on the social and behavioral theories that claim to tell us how the world works.

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CSBS 320. STATISTICS FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCES. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MATH proficiency required; MATH 121 recommended.
Introduces the theory and procedures underlying the use of statistics in the social sciences. During the first half of the class, methods are presented for organizing distributions, summarizing their key properties, conveying the relative standing of individual scores in distributions, and measuring relations between pairs of variables. Commonly used procedures for testing hypotheses in the social sciences are presented in the second half of the class.

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CSBS 321. COMPUTER AIDED DATA ANALYSIS. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320 or equivalent, CPLA 120 or  equivalent.
Introduces the use of SPSS running on personal computers for analyzing data in the social sciences. Topics include basic tasks such as entering and transforming data. Procedures covered include obtaining summary statistics of single varaiables, graphing variables organizing multivariate data, and testing hypotheses with t-tests, the analysis of variance, regression, and selected nonparametric tests. Fundamentals of factor analysis and discriminat function analysis are introduced with guidelines for interpreting output.

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CSBS 494. LEADERSHIP PORTFOLIO. 2 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Supervised by the certificate advisor, students will compile an assessment portfolio of significant assignments completed during the certificate program. In addition, students will enhance the portfolio by completing various exercises, including the development of a formal statement regarding their leadership philosophy. These statements will integrate various concepts and theories surveyed and critiqued during the certificate program.

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Creative Writing

CRWR 210. INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 or ENGL 201.
This course introduces students to the process, techniques and forms of creative writing including poetry, fiction and nonfiction.

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Criminal Justice

CRIM 300. INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM. 5 Credits.

This course is taught from the perspective of the criminologist and emphasizes the interaction within and between the systems of law enforcement, the courts and treatment.

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CRIM 340. ETHICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE. 5 Credits.

In this course, we will explore major ethical theories with an emphasis on their application to components of the criminal justice system. We will analyze current issues and ethical dilemmas that criminal justice professionals deal with. We will examine the complex process of moral and ethical decision making in the criminal justice system.

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CRIM 382. CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 5 Credits.

Basic organization and management of criminal justice agencies. Discusses line, personnel, and auxiliary functions.

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CRIM 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing; must be taken prior to internship.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course examines the relationship between the major subsystems of the criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Each of these major components address issues of crime in society with the same constituents, but from a different perspective. Examination of issues that each component has in common and the manner in which they are differently addressed is the focus of this course.

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