University Requirements


With a wide variety of courses offered online, you can earn your degree when it’s convenient for you.

Competencies & Proficiencies

ENGL 101. COLLEGE COMPOSITION: EXPOSITION AND ARGUMENTATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: Writing Placement Test or General Advising.
Satisfies: university competencies, writing.
Provides opportunities for students to develop and enhance their written communication skills. Stresses the organization, development and support of ideas and perspective in exposition and argumentation as public discourse, familiarization with library resources and application of the rules and conventions of standard American English.

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ENGL 201. COLLEGE COMPOSITION: ANALYSIS, RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101, Writing Placement Test or general advising.
Satisfies: university proficiencies, writing.
Stresses research skills, analytical writing, logic and other skills necessary to comprehend, synthesize and respond intelligently to academic discourse. Practices source evaluation and documentation across the disciplines. A special study unit emphasizing effective use of library resources is included.

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MATH 107. MATHEMATICAL REASONING. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 or MTHD 106 or equivalent course, or an ALEKS score ≥41.
Satisfies: completion of this course with a grade ≥C satisfies the university proficiencies in mathematics.
The course explores sets, basic logic, truth tables, elementary probability, statistics and basic finance mathematics. The spirit of the course is one of reasoning and problem solving. This is a terminal course intended for students not taking any other mathematics courses for their program of study. This proficiency may be satisfied by examination.

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Diversity

AAST 214. AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURE AND EXPRESSIONS. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HONS 214, HUMN 214.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
An interdisciplinary survey of African American culture beginning with ancient African history and traditions through contemporary issues in the African American experience. Attention given to basic principles of history, sociology, political science, economics and the arts in the study of the dynamics of the African American culture.

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AAST 215. EARLY AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO THE END OF THE RECONSTRUCTION 1877. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HONS 215, HIST 215.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
An examination of the history of African Americans from African civilizations in the 10th century A.D. through American slavery to the end of the Reconstruction era in the U.S. Major attention will be given to the social, political, and economic evolution of African Americans as a whole as well as the individual lives and work of famous black leaders.

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ADST 308. CULTURAL ISSUES IN ADDICTION TREATMENT AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH. 4 Credits.

Notes: This course is available for on campus students online and off campus students online. Please see your advisor for the appropriate section.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
Students examine issues regarding the treatment of persons from different cultural and ethnic backgrounds–persons with disabilities (physical, cognitive), LGBTQ+ individuals, women and the elderly–by the mainstream culture of the U.S. in health care, substance use disorder treatment, educational settings and other social, political, and community venues.

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ANTR 325. INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course is a survey of the various Indian cultures in North America with a particular emphasis on exploring the relationships between Indian communities, federal policies and institutions and broader American society. The course will examine various Indian cultural traditions and lifeways, issues of identity maintenance, land claims, sacred site protection, repatriation and the complex, complicated and contentious historical relationship between anthropology and Indian communities.

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CHST 218. CHICANO HISTORY. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 218.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course offers a study of Chicano history from the time of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, to the present. Specific themes discussed include the Mexican American War, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848, the economic, political and social conditions after the Anglo-American conquest of the southwest, Mexican immigration to the U.S., Chicano labor history, the Chicano movement and other Chicano themes.

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CHST 320. CHICANX-LATINX POLITICS IN U.S. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
The purpose of this course is to study the political reality of Latinxs in the U.S.: a heterogeneous group made up largely of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban American origin and other groups (Central and South Americans). This class examines the Latino population in terms of its orientation to the political system, its institutions, actors and their participation in the electoral process.

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CHST 330. LATINO IMMIGRATION TO THE U.S.. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 201.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course is a historical overview of Latino immigration from Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean. Special attention is given to the largest Latino sub groups in the United States. Students examine the social phenomenon of labor migration and immigration from Latin America in the context of political, economic and national inequalities. The transnational character of Latino immigrants and its political, economic and cultural contributions to sending and receiving nations are covered.

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CMST 340. INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION. 5 Credits.

Notes: English and computer proficiency desired but not required.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This is a combination theory and application course on intercultural communication. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to some of the fundamental topics, theories, concepts, and principles that are at the center of the study of intercultural communication. The course follows a multi-media approach; students will see how media (newspapers, TV, film, and Internet) reveal patterns of cultural behavior and shape how we see and interact with people from other cultures.

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DSST 310. DISABILITY, CULTURE AND SOCIETY. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with DSST 501.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
Disability and persons with disabilities have been with us throughout the history of humankind. This course familiarizes students to disability as a component of the diverse tapestry of society. Historical disability conceptualizations and issues are discussed. Contemporary and emerging explanations of disability in contemporary society and Disability Culture are explored.

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IDST 101. INTRODUCTION TO INDIAN STUDIES. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course introduces the basic philosophy (spiritual and intellectual sources), method and major topics of the discipline. Material explored includes organizing concepts, theories and patterns within a historical context-including white contact time and pre-white contact time.

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IDST 321. CONTEMPORARY INDIAN ISSUES. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course will examine the contemporary educational, social, political and cultural issues currently impacting Native American communities. Through individual and group research, students will discuss a range of issues including educational reform, community organizing, economic development, land rights, the breakdown of traditional families and culturally relevant program development within various Native American communities. Focus will be on the Native American nations.

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IDST 437. INDIAN CHILD WELFARE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: SOWK 437.
Notes: The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA, United States Code Title 25, §1901-1963) is central to this course and child welfare practice.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
This course meets diversity criteria by examining movements that shape or challenge systems of power, privilege, oppression, and colonization. American Indians challenged state removal of their children resulting in federal law affirming tribal rights to protect families and children. Indian Child Welfare (ICW) covers legal, historical, and cultural issues applying to work with American Indian and Alaska Native families. Tribal and state child welfare perspectives are needed to understand ICW.

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PSYC 331. PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN. 4 Credits.

Cross-listed: GWSS 331.
Pre-requisites: completion of ENGL 201 or equivalent.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
The psychology of women and gender in terms of history, bodies, socialization, personality, affiliation, achievement, motivation, mental health, and personal growth needs.

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Foreign Language

ASL 101. FIRST YEAR AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: completion of series satisfies the university foreign language requirement.
A basic introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) and Deaf Culture. ASL 101 includes basic ASL vocabulary, grammatical structures, and conversational behaviors. Focus will be placed on the development of the conceptual aspects of the language. Special emphasis will be placed on the cultural values and beliefs shared by the Deaf Community.

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ASL 102. FIRST YEAR AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ASL 101 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: completion of series satisfies the university foreign language requirement.
Further instruction in the development of expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language, development of more advanced vocabulary and the use of space and expression as a part of the linguistic form of this visual language. Includes exploration into the structure of the deaf culture.

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ASL 103. FIRST YEAR AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ASL 101 and ASL 102 or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: completion of series satisfies the university foreign language requirement.
Further instruction in the development of expressive and receptive skills in American Sign Language, development of more advanced vocabulary and the use of space and expression as a part of the linguistic form of this visual language. Includes exploration into the structure of the deaf culture.

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SPAN 101. FIRST-YEAR SPANISH I. 5 Credits.

The beginning Spanish sequence of courses, covering grammar, composition, conversation and discussion of cultural topics.

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SPAN 102. FIRST-YEAR SPANISH II. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SPAN 101 or equivalent.
The beginning Spanish sequence of courses, covering grammar, compostion, conversation and discussion of cultural topics.

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SPAN 103. FIRST-YEAR SPANISH III. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: SPAN 102 or equivalent.
The beginning Spanish sequence of courses, covering grammar, composition, conversation and discussion of cultural topics.

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Global Studies

AAST 315. AFRICAN HISTORY: ANCIENT AFRICA TO MANDELA. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HIST 315, HONS 315.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 10 or equivalent.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
This course will examine the historical unfolding of Africa both domestically and internationally. The major topics will include such themes as traditional institutions, political development, European colonialism, African nationalism along with the struggle for independence and the entry into the global free market and world affairs.

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ADST 310. GLOBALLY SPEAKING: WHAT ABOUT DRUGS?. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 or permission of instructor.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
The world market for illegal drugs is the world's largest illicit market. The illegal drug business has begun to reshape itself along the tenets of the new world economy. Poor countries that produce drugs face massive corruption in police, army and government circles. This course will explore the implicaitons of drug manufacturing, sales, licit and illicit drug production, laws and policies that impact the way drugs are classified and approved.

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ANTR 342. MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
The course introduces students to cross-cultural perspectives and critical theories in anthropological studies of medicine. Special attention is given to diverse ways of understanding bodies, illnesses, and therapeutic practices in our changing world. Specifically, it compares non-medical models of disease causality and healing with biomedical establishments, and examines how social and technological inequalities shape health and health outcomes.

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BIOL 320. THE HUMAN PROSPECT. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HUMN 320.
Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
Explores the biological and philosophical roots of humans' relationship with the environment.

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DSST 420. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with DSST 520.
Pre-requisites: successful completion of a university diversity course or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
This course explores how laws and policies affect diverse people and groups; majority and minority, domestically and globally. It goes beyond laws and policies affecting discrete groups based on their characteristics by addressing intersectionalities, analyzing beliefs and practices that transcend specific times, identities, and locations. It looks at how societies and contexts frame people’s individual characteristics and traits and develop policies and practices.

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HUMN 315. EAST-WEST PHILOSOPHIES AND RELIGIONS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: sophomore standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
Comparative study of the world’s theological systems in their philosophical, historical and ethical contexts.

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SOCI 263. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–global studies.
An overview of major perspectives on social problems and a demonstration of their relevance for contemporary issues. Topics may include poverty, racism, sexism, aging, alienation, colonialism and the Third World, human ecology, crime, deviance and the law.

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Humanities & Arts

CMST 207. COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY AND CITIZENSHIP. 5 Credits.

Notes: the course will culminate with students creating a reasoned, ethical argument as a final project.
This course is designed to develop critical thinking skills as exhibited in reasoning and argumentation, with a further goal of examining how the power of an individual's voice can affect society. The course begins with a study of the rhetorical tradition of reasoning and argumentation, including elements of ethics. As the course progresses students will analyze, from historical to modern times, examples of individuals using their voice and the resulting impact upon society.

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ENGL 170. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
An examination of literary approaches in human experience including short fiction, poetry and drama. Principal attention to the elements that make up literature, with supporting discussion of ideas, attitudes, problems and values.

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HLED 202. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH, WELLNESS AND SUSTAINABLE LIVING. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101, may be taken concurrently or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
This course is design to be an introductory health, wellness, and sustainability living class that provides a broad overview of a number of topics that specifically focus on living a healthy physically active lifestyle connecting people, place and planet as well as increasing an individual’s awareness of how to be a greener consumer.

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HUMN 211. WESTERN LITERATURE II. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
This course examines European and Islamic literature of the Middle Ages until the Renaissance. Students will learn about the tradition of Western and Islamic ideas and learn to distinguish genres, such as epic, romance, and lyric, and narrative techniques, like frame narrative and allegory, and learn how these express cultural narratives, beliefs, and symbols, and finally to develop skills in critical reading, writing, and the use of sources.

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HUMN 212. MUSIC IN ARTS AND CULTURE. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: MUSC 212.
Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
This course is a survey with primary focus on Western classical music in terms of humanistic development with emphasis on musical style and structure and relations with the other arts.

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HUMN 215. INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
Introduction to Religion provides an introduction to the basic range of methods and issues in the study of religion. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach, one that is multi-dimensional, and cross-cultural in its sampling of religious perspectives. The course takes a phenomenological and non-sectarian approach to the study of religion. It describes the experiences, beliefs, and behaviors of religious people without prescribing them for the student and/or the instructor.

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HUMN 270. GREAT WORLD VIEWS. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
This course involves an analyses of selected writings from the viewpoint of what is said about human nature, the scheme of things and humanity's place in that scheme. The emphasis is upon rational reflection and the relation of various philosophies to the life and conduct of the student. A variety of potential topics are looked at with particular attention to connections between and among topics.

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PHIL 210. CRITICAL THINKING. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
Logic as a tool for the analysis of informal arguments. The course develops techniques for formalizing and testing arguments from everyday life.

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PHIL 211. INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
Some traditional problems about the nature of the world and human knowledge. Typical problems concern the existence of God, personal identity and free will, the relations of minds to bodies and of perception to the external world.

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PHIL 212. INTRODUCTORY ETHICS. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
An examination of the nature and content of morality. Two questions are central: Is morality based on knowledge or on emotion? Is there a rational motive to act morally?

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PHIL 213. MORAL ISSUES IN AMERICA. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
An introduction to normative moral issues in current thought and life. Typical problems concern social justice, the relation of work to a person’s concept of himself, manipulation and indoctrination in a technological society and relationships between social success and human flourishing.

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SPAN 170. INTRODUCTION TO HISPANIC CULTURES. 5 Credits.

Notes: taught in English, no knowledge of Spanish is required.
Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
This course examines cultural experiences (including ideas, attitudes, identities, problems and values) by studying, discussing and writing about various texts (cultural productions such as literature, film, visual art, podcasts, etc.).

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Natural Sciences

ANTR 204. ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for natural science.
Archaeology provides a useful case study for the practical application of natural science knowledge in support of the needs of disciplines both within and without the broader natural sciences. Students explore the archaeological sciences of remote sensing and probabilistic surveying, radiometric and isotope dating, fauna/floral analysis, climate reconstruction and change, reconstruction of subsistence patterns and population health, mortality and movements among others.

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GEOG 100. FUNDAMENTALS OF THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for natural sciences.
An introduction to the principal components of our Earth’s natural systems of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere with emphasis on the dynamic patterns and processes of air, water, soil, vegetation, landforms and habitat, and the interrelated role of humans.

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Senior Capstone

ADST 490. ADST SENIOR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing and declared major in Addiction Studies or permission of instructor or program director.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course covers the eight Practice Dimensions and Transdisciplinary Foundation knowledge that is the ideal standard the addiction counselor strives to master. Students who plan to move forward with WA state licensure as Chemical Dependency Professionals gain a cumulative summary of the above practice dimension skills, knowledge and attitudes that accomplished counselors strive to master.

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CDST 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE CHILDREN'S STUDIES. 5 Credits.

Notes: requires the successful completion of a background check.
Pre-requisites: CDST 302 and senior standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
Using knowledge of children, childhood, and children's issues, students will research, design and implement a joint community-based service-learning project in collaboration with local organizations that work with and/or on-behalf of children.

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CRIM 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: senior standing; must be taken prior to internship.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course examines the relationship between the major subsystems of the criminal justice system, police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Each of these major components address issues of crime in society with the same constituents, but from a different perspective. Examination of issues that each component has in common and the manner in which they are differently addressed is the focus of this course.

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DSST 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT IN UNIVERSAL ACCESS. 5 Credits.

Notes: may be stacked with DSST 590.
Pre-requisites: DSST 410 or permission of the instructor.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
This course provides students the opportunity to develop a community-based, service-learning project with colleagues from multiple academic disciplines. Under the direction of the instructor, students participate in a project that addresses universal access in the context of a diverse society. Weekly lectures integrate conceptual and practical learning relative to universal access for diverse populations including those with disabilities.

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ITGS 400. INTERDISCIPLINARY SR CAPSTONE. 4 Credits.

Notes: The university offers this course as an option for completing the senior capstone graduation requirement, depending on the student's major. Major advisers can inform students about their major senior capstone requirements.
Pre-requisites: senior standing.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
The course carries students from the academic community into civic life. It assembles students into teams for studying problems students will confront as citizens in the Pacific Northwest. It asks students individually and in collaboration with others to produce documents which address these problems by drawing from an array of disciplinary perspectives.

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PSYC 490. SENIOR CAPSTONE: THE TRADITION OF PSYCHOLOGY. 6 Credits.

Pre-requisites: CSBS 320, PSYC 309 and PSYC 413; all with a grade ≥C and a declared BA Psychology major.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–senior capstone.
The course consists of three components: the history of psychology; a collaborative project; portfolio preparation.

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Social Sciences

AAST 220. AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY: POST CIVIL WAR TO PRESENT. 5 Credits.

Cross-listed: HONS 220, HIST 220.
Satisfies: a university graduation requirement–diversity.
An examination of the history of African Americans from the end of the Reconstruction era to contemporary issues of today. Major attention will be given to the social political, and economic evolution of African Americans as a whole as well as the individual lives and work of famous black leaders and grassroots movements.

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CMST 208. MASS MEDIA AND THE INFORMATION SOCIETY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
This course introduces students to the range of historical, cultural, economic and social issues affected by the development and continued evolution of mass media. Books, magazines, sound and video recording, the development of electronic media and of the internet provide the context for examinations of media uses and effects, media policy and law and social effects of media.

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ECON 100. GENERAL EDUCATION ECONOMICS. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
General consideration of economic reasoning and methodology through examination of fundamental concepts in micro- and macroeconomics and through extension and applications of economic theory.

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ECON 200. INTRODUCTION TO MICROECONOMICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 completed.
Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
Examines the general functioning of a price system using fundamentals of supply and demand. Explores the variety of market forms, theory of factor incomes and the effects of government intervention to promote efficiency and equity.

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ECON 201. INTRODUCTION TO MACROECONOMICS. 5 Credits.

Pre-requisites: MTHD 104 completed.
Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
Reviews national income accounts and the determinants of national income and employment for an economy. Explores the impact of monetary and fiscal policy on aggregate performance and considers specific problems such as full employment, inflation, economic growth and international economic relations.

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GEOG 101. FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN GEOGRAPHY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
An introduction to the study of spatial variations among human cultures and the patterns of interaction between humans and the natural environment, with special emphasis on topics including language, religion, demography, political systems, technology, agriculture, manufacturing and urbanization.

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HIST 105. EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION TO 1500. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for humanities and arts.
This course presents the cultural, religious, military and political development of the near East and Europe from the classical period through the middle ages and renaissance. In particular, students will learn about the religious contexts in which monotheisms emerged, the evolution of ancient city-states and empires, feudalism, and the emergence of monarchical states.

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HIST 106. EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION, 1500 TO PRESENT. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
This course presents the political, social, cultural and economic developments of European civilization since the Protestant Reformation. In particular, students will learn about the industrial revolution, European imperialism, the World Wars, Globalization and the European Union project.

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HIST 110. AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: A SURVEY. 5 Credits.

A broad survey of unique features of the American experience, this course examines the origins and development of the American social, economic and political heritage on the domestic and international scenes.

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POLI 100. INTRODUCTION TO US POLITICS. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
This course is an introduction to the workings of the United States government from an historical, theoretical, and institutional point of view. Subjects of study include the founding of the United States, federalism, civil rights and civil liberties, political parties and interest groups, and American political institutions such as Congress, the Presidency, the Judiciary. The course also addresses fundamental concepts such as power, ideology, and the citizen role in democratic politics.

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PSYC 100. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
A general introduction to psychology as the scientific study of behavior and thought; an overview of the areas of psychology and their development; methods in psychology; biological, sensory and developmental influences on behavior; physiological and cognitive components of behavior; theories of learning; a survey of theories of normal and abnormal behavior; principles of psychotherapy; personality theory and testing; and social influences.

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PSYC 201. LIFE-SPAN DEVELOPMENT. 5 Credits.

Satisfies: a BACR for social sciences.
A broad overview of human development from birth to death. Topics covered include the biological, cognitive, learning, cultural and socio-emotional influences on development. Designed for the non-major.

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SOCI 101. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. 5 Credits.

Explores the concepts, principles and theories of sociology. Sociology seeks to develop a body of interrelated scientific propositions or generalizations that explain social behavior in non-psychological terms. Its basic goal is to understand how human beings fit their activities together into a system of stable (and sometimes unstable) social arrangements.

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